Tag Archives: Craft

Raw Art – Come Journaling Along

Administrivia!

If you’re reading this in an email, thank you! As I’ve been sorting through my creative selves, it’s become obvious that my art and pattern design needs its own separate home here at MonetteSattefield.com. If you’re subscribed to receive email notices of posts about art and the creative life, that’s exactly what you’ll get on the same semi infrequent basis as always.

For those of you who signed up for business writing, that’s now over at Shiny Designs.com (with an all new eye-popping design with a pink rabbit) so please head on over there and sign up. I hope you’ll stay with me here too because it all comes from the same creative well.

Create for Yourself

How long has it been since you made art just for yourself? For some of us, the answer is too long. My friend from Wholly Piecemeal mentioned this book: Raw Art Journaling. Continue reading Raw Art – Come Journaling Along

What is it with Starting Projects?

We’ve talked about UFO’s , those unfinished objects lurking in tote bags and closets, now let’s have a look at the other side of that story. Starting projects is fun, fun, fun, but it does have a dark side. Many of them turn into UFO’s with time passing and interest waning. So, why start so many projects when they can never all be finished?

Temporary Infatuation. What else can I say? It’s a crush on some new yarn, material or technique that just has to be tried. So, there’s another project started and the first hours or days are wonderful and exciting. Then, the crush dissipates, reality sets in and the faults and flaws of the thing are obvious. The color’s wrong, the technique is boring or truly aggravating or the finished item just isn’t something worth having. Here’s a UFO newly born and one that probably won’t ever be completed.

Simple Projects. These are the projects I like to call “mindless”. These are the ones that travel to the in-laws and the meetings to keep the hands busy and just enough of the brain occupied to keep from going nuts. These are useful and necessary projects. Very seldom do they age into UFO’s even though some take quite a while to finish.

Real Love. This is the prize in projects starts. These are things that the end result is something I love and truly want in my life. These projects can vary greatly in difficulty and time commitment. The materials and techniques are secondary to the item itself so learning something new or working with not so favorite materials is often worth it. The UFO danger here is taking too long to finish the project. If that happens, changes in taste or lifestyle can make it obsolete before it’s done.

There are just a few of my excuses to start a new project. I’m sure there are countless other explanations waiting to be discovered and used. So go ahead and start something new, you’ve got a good reason.

The UFO (Unfinished Object) Problem

I have lots of UFOs because starting projects is my favorite thing. The thrill of new yarns, fibers and fabrics and the shining possibilities of the finished projects – that’s heady stuff.

Of course, reality is somewhat different, isn’t it? Like many, my expectations are often higher than my ability to finish them all. I’m usually happy with the finished projects and they are very often as nice as or better than I envisioned. It’s just so darned difficult getting to that point. In my own land of the UFO, I’ve decided that there are three methods of dealing with them.

First, just drag it out, grit your teeth and finish it. This works very well for things that are almost done and for the projects that are going pretty well to begin with. Usually, I find that it’s enjoyable to work on a long put away project and the extra bonus of finishing is wonderful.

Second, repurpose it or condense it and make something new. Because this usually takes more thought and planning, it works better on projects that aren’t going very well, aren’t turning out as planned, or are just way too large to finish as started. This reworking is good for projects that you like the materials and are still interested in. Of course, the new project may run the risk of becoming another UFO.

Third, admit to yourself that you no longer even like it, will never finish it and then get rid of it without any guilt whatsoever. This option is the fastest but not always the easiest because we all agonize over the guilt part. It’s as if we’ve asked the project to go steady and now want to break up. Try having a UFO swap with friends – one woman’s trash is another woman’s treasure – or donate them to charity. Either way, get it out of your life and see how much easier you breathe.

The best part of tackling the UFO problem is the twin rewards. You’ll have many lovely finished projects that make you the envy of your friends and associates. And, better yet, you can now start even more new projects!

The Fastest Apron in the World


OK, so the whole world may be an exaggeration, but this is the fastest way I know to make a utilitarian apron. These are the kinds of aprons that you can actually use to cook or clean or craft in and if you wipe your hands on it, well, that’s what they’re for.

Start with a tea or dish towel around 18 inches by 30 inches and a 72 inch length of 1 inch wide grosgrain ribbon. Center the ribbon on top of the long edge of the towel and pin in place. Sew the ribbon in place on both long edges. Trim ribbon ends at an angle. Apply fray retardant to the ends if desired.

That’s it, apron finished.

If you’re like me, here’s where you start thinking “I sure would like a pocket or two on this and maybe I could just add a bit of trim.” Well, yes, those things would be good, but then, it’s become another project and will be too nice to use when you finally search out the perfect trim, buy it and get around to attaching it.

Now, tie it around your waist and get to work.